Search results for David Payne.

079: April 2007

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Trench Diseases of the First World War

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Trench Diseases of the First World War Introduction to the Western Front The establishment by the belligerent nations, in late 1914, of a complex line of trenches stretching almost 500 miles (800 km) from the North Sea to the Swiss Border, brought with it an extraordinary concentration of millions of men from many nations and cultures. These men …


The BEF, Human Diseases and Trench Warfare on The Western Front

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The BEF, Human Diseases and Trench Warfare on The Western Front Introduction   The Great War was the first major conflict where the death rate due to the trauma of war (largely inflicted by projectiles such as bullets and shells) was greater than that due to disease; on the Western Front the ratio was 5:1. But no soldier on the Western Front c…


The Rationale for and the Deployment of Poisonous Gas on The Western Front in the Great War

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The rationale for and the deployment of poisonous gas on The Western Front in the Great War Introduction In early 1915, accounts were freely circulated in turn by the French, British and Germans that poisonous gas was being used as a weapon of war by their opponents on the Western Front. This was in clear contravention of the 1899 Hague Convent…


Why the British Army did not mutiny en masse on the Western Front during the First World War

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Why the British Army did not mutiny en masse on the Western Front during the First World War Many historians of the Great War, both professional and amateur, have used much ink and paper in the discussion of why, uniquely among the major Powers, the British Army never faced serious mutiny in the Great War. And, particularly, given the horrendous…