Search results for Home Rule.

Aftermath: Ireland

/world-war-i-articles/aftermath-ireland/

Amongst those commemorated on Lewes War Memorial is Lance-Corporal Sidney Wright 1/6th Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment, aged 22. One of three brothers lost during the Great War, he was serving in Ireland when he accidentally drowned just outside Wicklow whilst bathing at Travilahawk Strand, between the military camp near the harbour entrance an…


The Contemptible Little Army, 1914 -1918

/world-war-i-articles/the-contemptible-little-army-1914-1918/

By Alex Saunt   The story of the expansion and development of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) 1914-1918 and how the Contemptible Little Army became a huge, effective machine.   BEF AND THE START The possible conception: In 1904 King Edward, having decided our pretty frosty relationship with France should be improved, went to Paris with the…


Ep. 178 – Irish Recruitment in World War One – Dr Tim Bowman, Dr Michael Wheatley & Dr William Butler

/the-latest-wwi-podcast/ep-178-irish-recruitment-in-world-war-one-dr-tim-bowman-dr-michael-wheatley-dr-william-butler/

Dr Timothy Bowman, a Reader in modern British military history, University of Kent, Dr William Butler, the Head of Military Records, The National Archives, UK and Dr Michael Wheatley, an independent researcher who writes on early twentieth-century Irish politics, talk about their latest book, The Disparity of Sacrifice. This book examines the mi…


19 January 1918 : Brigadier General Gordon Strachey Shephard

/on-this-day/19-january-1918-brigadier-general-gordon-strachey-shephard/

Whilst researching Dorset War Memorials, the author came across the following paragraph: ‘In the grounds of the camp (1) at Osmington is a small wooden sentry box. Inside is a truncated propeller, cut to form a cross. On the boss is a small plaque which reads: ‘In memory of Brigadier G S Sheppard DSO, MC and RFC Jan 1918’.’ (2) Living near the …


The Irish Struggle for Home Rule by Dr Graham Mayhew

/world-war-i-articles/the-irish-struggle-for-home-rule-by-dr-graham-mayhew/

The Irish struggle for home rule and subsequently independence can be traced back to the Act of Union of 1800 when the Irish Parliament, from which Catholics were barred, voted to dissolve itself. Daniel O’Connell’s successful campaign for Catholic Emancipation, passed by Act of Parliament in 1829 and the support he received for his public agitat…