Search results for Medal Index Card.

Major Arthur Hughes-Onslow: soldier, jockey and one of the first British deaths in the Great War

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Arthur Hughes-Onslow was born in 1862. He joined the 10th Hussars at Lucknow, India and stayed in the regiment for 20 years. Along the way, he acquired the nickname of 'Junks', although he had no idea why it was given to him. It soon became the name by which he was known by family, friends, the racing public and fellow soldiers alike. Everyone w…


Medal Index Cards

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During the late part of the First World War the Army Medal Office began a system of making out an index card for each individual soldier (officers and other ranks). This was in order to create a record of the individual's entitlement to campaign medals and gallantry medals.  The Medal Index Card which were created include some or all of the follow…


A Liverpool Lad at Ypres

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“The Valley of the Shadow, 31 July 1917. Down in the valley the Steenbeek flows, A brook you may cross with an easy stride, In death’s own valley between the rows of stunted willows om either side. You may cross in the sunshine without a care, with a brow that is fanned by the summer’s breath, Though you cross with a laugh, yet pause with a pr…


The 'fake' French Aristocrat at Etaples

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In the vast expanse of Etaples Military Cemetery are thousands of headstones. Each of these represents the last resting place of a casualty of the war. No doubt all stories are unique, but to misquote George Orwell’s ‘Animal Farm’, some are 'more unique than others'.   Above: Etaples Military Cemetery Below is the image of a headstone of what wo…