Search results for Commemoration.

The Great War, Memory and Ritual: Commemoration in the City and East London, 1916-1939

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Book review by James Brazier. This is the latest volume in The Royal Historical Society's Studies in History series. The book's author, Dr Mark Connelly, is Reuters Lecturer in Media History at the University of Kent and has given talks to a number of Western Front Association Branches in the south east on Great War British and Canadian war artist…


‘1918-2018: The End of the War and the Re-Shaping of a Century’ 6-8 September

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‘1918-2018: The End of the War and the Re-Shaping of a Century’   This important and unique conference will be taking place between the 6-8 September 2018 at the University of Wolverhampton. Seven keynote addresses from some of the leading academic authorities on the First World War and its aftermath will be at the heart of the conference, alo…


116: October 2019 Special Edition

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Ep. 29 – Commemoration of the Great War in Ireland – Dr Chris Manson

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Dr Chris Manson talks on ‘Commemoration of WW1 in Ireland’. This talk was given to Antrim and Down branch of the WFA in 2016. The normal routine of interviews will begin after the summer break.


Armistice Day Commemoration 2020 Video

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For those of you who like me watched the Covid restricted Remembrance Sunday coverage from the BBC probably would agree that it was a sad experience. Sadder still is the numerous Remembrance Day services up and down Britain that have fallen victim to the pandemic and more specifically the lockdown. When it became apparent that last week’s renewed …


To What Extent was the Empire’s Commemoration of Those who Served During the First World War Equal?

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[This article is by Matthew Cogan aged 19, and is based on his essay which won the Colin Hardy Memorial Prize. Matthew is now (2020-2021) in his first year studying history at the University of Oxford.]  The First World War was the bloodiest war the world had ever seen when it ended in 1918. It was a truly worldwide conflict; both the first and la…


Childhood memories of Gallipoli in the 1920s

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The passion of members of the Western Front Association is such that few fail to recognise an important historic account when they come across one – and thanks to member Edward Lever, a rare first-hand account and photographs of early commemorative work and commemoration at Gallipoli would be recorded for posterity. As part of our ongoing explorat…


Ep.232 - The CWGC Non-Commemoration Report on Inequalities of Commemoration – Dr George Hay

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Dr George Hay, the Official Historian at Commonwealth War Graves Commission, talks about the recent Commission report on the inequalities in the way the organisation commemorated the dead of the British Empire from the Great War.


ONLINE : ‘The First World War and its Global Commemorative Legacies’

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From the University of Kent's Centre for War, Media and Society. A panel discussion around some of the key themes surrounding the global commemoration of the First World War The University of Kent’s Centre for War, Media and Society will be joined by Prof Mark Connelly (University of Kent, UK), Dr Dominiek Dendooven (In Flanders Fields Mus…


Brothers in Arms: Three Died and Three Survived the First World War

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The First World War resulted in terrible suffering for many families, but the Willis family was among those that paid the highest of prices: six brothers went to war, but only three came home. Of the surviving siblings, one had lost a leg and the other two also left with recurring health problems. The Willis family had travelled from Nottingham to…


The Controversy of Commemoration in Ramsbottom after the First World War

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War memorials are contentious: the commissioning of large public sculptures has often divided communities, with stories of bitter discord surfacing both during the Great War and in the years that followed. Disputes about the control of war memorial committees, as well as the decisions made by them, often made local newspaper headlines. The main c…


Death of a Princess: The Destruction of HMS Princess Irene 27 May 1915

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In May 1913 the Canadian Pacific Railway had placed an order with Denny’s of Dumbarton for two new ships for their route on the Pacific coast between Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle. The ships were elegant and well appointed three-funnelled vessels 350 feet long with a 54 foot beam and displacing 5,500 tons. Oil-fuelled boilers drove two propellers…